The Question Everyone Asks Me? Who to Follow?…Answered
Mar28

The Question Everyone Asks Me? Who to Follow?…Answered

  On this Friday, which is reserved for Friday Follow or #FF on Twitter, I want to say thank you to my PLN for making me a better educator. For those of you not familiar with a PLN, let me explain. In simple terms, a Personal Learning Network (PLN) is a network of people you interact with that help you to become a better educator or person. You could do this face to face, or virtually – or BOTH!  I like to use social media to build my PLN. I use Twitter  to find game-changing information about innovative teaching strategies from around the world!   I have become so passionate about Twitter because it is an information powerhouse, and so easy to learn. The big question always is…who to follow? That is a really hard question for me to answer, because it changes all the time! Since I have many Ed Tech friends it is a really touchy subject.  I don’t want to hurt any feelings because almost everyone in my PLN shares amazing insight and resources.  To compile this list, I have been keeping track of those people who have brought me the most important information and ideas over the last month. From that,  I made this list of the  20 people. This list changes as interactions change, so a person left off this list might make the next one. 1.George Couros @gcouros Edmonton, Canada 2. Alice Keeler @alicekeeler – Fresno, California 3. Tanya Avrith @tanyaavrith – Montreal, Canada and now South Florida 4. Jennie Magiera @MsMagiera – Chicago, Illinois 5. Kyle Pace @kylepace Lee’s Summit, Missouri 6. David Theriault @davidtedu Orange County, California 7. Edudemic @edudemic 8. Edutopia @edutopia 9. Jamie Casap  @jcasap Google Evangelist Phoenix, Arizona 10. Greg Kulowiec @gregkulowiec Plymouth, Mass 11. Ken Shelton @K_Shelton Los Angeles, California 12. Patrick Larkin @PatrickMLarkin Burlington, Mass 13. Alec Couros @courosa Regina, Canada 14 .Josh Stumpenhorst ‏@stumpteacher  Chicago, IL 15. Craig Badura ‏@mrbadura Aurora, Nebraska 16. Jason Markey @JasonMMarkey Chicago, IL 17. Mark Wagner @MarkWagner Irvine, CA 18. Sue Gorman @sjgorman Racine, Wisconsin 19. Wes Fryer @wfryer Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 20. Brad Ovenell-Carter @Braddo Vancouver, Canada Special Mention: Craig Yen  @CraigYen – this kid can share! He follows edtech and shares everything that is going on. It is amazing! If you want to follow me, I am Holly Clark @HollyClarkEdu. Share...

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Leading the New Literacies: Digital, Media & Global
Mar17

Leading the New Literacies: Digital, Media & Global

This blog comes from a session by Heidi Hayes Jacobs at ASCD conference March 15th, 2014. She is the source of this blog and all the words are hers – just typed and worded for effect by me. Personal Note: Heidi Hayes Jacobs is a  hero of mine. Her work with the curriculum has fueled a passion in me. One I cannot seem to quench. I refer to her TED Talk often and find her ideas about getting kids ready for their future (or just simply today), and not 1984, is spot on. The New Literacies: Digital, Media and Global – The idea that we are teaching an entire day focused around print literacies and nothing about media is one of the fundamental problems with education. We are  thoughtful and deliberate in the teaching of print, but teachers are not so thoughtful about the other literacies despite the fact that students spend up to 5 times as much time dealing with media than print. Essential Question: How do we prepare our learners for their future, not 1990 which seems to be the year most schools are getting them ready for. This type of  information or way of thinking is intended to make us uncomfortable – if it does not we are really not growing. One of the problems is that most, if not all schools are not preparing their students for 2025 and their curriculum is not current. There seems to be an anxiety about these new literacies,  but since there is a new learner in town and we have to get ready for them by creating new pedagogy. The major issue is that students need to be engaged in the information. At this point there is no going back and we have to get prepared for them and teachers need to understand the idea of shared physical space and shared virtual space. Heidi talks about being totally against the self-contained classrooms-  and that today’s classrooms are really just a parallel universe with the one room school house. The New Literacies: The Digital Literacies: Selection and Creation Capabilities Selection Capability – This includes being able to access the devices through keyboard fluency, touch and effect and understanding how to properly use and manipulate voice activation. Being able to “select” the right tool will become a critical competency for students. Will they be able to find the right search tool,  and effectively learn to organize information found  through tagging (My comment: I believe tagging is the most important and under taught tool in teaching right now – this is probably because teachers don’t often understand it themselves). The idea that kids need to be able to “create”...

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Blogging and Commenting with Linda Yollis
Nov08

Blogging and Commenting with Linda Yollis

Do not miss this EduSlam! Since the day I signed up for my Twitter account, Linda Yollis has been one of my favorite follows. Thanks to Twitter,  living in southern California and our Google Certified Teacher network,  I now proudly (and with a hint of name-dropping) call her a friend. This is a great honor for me because I consider her to be one of the finest educators alive. Every time I speak with her, I am inspired and motivated to keep pushing in the direction of transforming the classroom and connecting students with a global audience. Seth Godin calls this personal learning network that we have all developed through Twitter  – a Tribe – and being in a Tribe with Linda makes me proud and invigorated. In this EduSlam, she talks about the importance of using blogs to teach digital literacy and explains how she has developed with her students the skill of commenting – her work in this area should inspire us all. To watch other amazing EduSlam episodes – visit www.eduslam.me       Share...

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Digital Natives vs. Digital Immigrants
Oct07

Digital Natives vs. Digital Immigrants

Alice Keeler posted the above video about students being digital natives. Teachers are always afraid that their students will know more than them about the technology. In my opinion, students are more aptly called digital tourists than digital natives. They are exploring this unknown territory at the same time as we are. The only difference is that most students are usually not afraid to push every button. As adults we like directions and are often afraid to traverse unknown territory without a map. My advice? Let go and have fun  – let the journey through technology integration be more about learning and less about control. Share...

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How To Tackle Digital Citizenship at Your School
Sep06

How To Tackle Digital Citizenship at Your School

This article was originally published on Edudemic on August 19th. Digital citizenship is not a one time discussion. It is an ongoing process that needs to be taught to all grade levels and to all stakeholders. The problem is that things are changing so rapidly that it is difficult for everyone to keep up to date with the trends.  Everyone has to be educated and develop an understanding of the role digital citizenship plays in our everyday lives. There is so much that goes into being a digital citizen; from taking photos of others to knowing when it is appropriate to share something online. Our students are like cowboys living in the wild wild west. Without any guidelines or structure they can get in a lot of trouble. Armed with a concrete plan for teaching about appropriate use you can guide your students to become better digital citizens, who will learn how to build their digital presence in a positive and productive way. Create An Acceptable Use Policy WITH Your Students – Give Them a Voice Every September we pass out the obligatory Acceptable Use Policies with little thought to what they include. This has to stop!  Instead, the first five days should be a time for an amazingly rich discussion on safety and responsibility. Get the students involved by writing a classroom AUP together and begin the discussion with a framework of questions that guide the process. When you involve students, they will surprise you with their ability to understand the choices behind their digital interactions. Student voice equals more student buy-in. For this discussion, think about digital citizenship in general, at school, at home and in transit. A rich discussion should include these and other components: Who is responsible for the technology or the device – what does that entail? Who is in charge of accounts and where do they keep their passwords Discuss the idea of password literacies Decorating of devices – can students put any backgrounds and homescreen they want? What will be the limits on pictures and movies When can they be on social media and communicating with others? Consequences of off-task behavior in class Limits on personal work on device Charging of devices Parents monitoring at home – should kids have to power down at a certain point Discuss “Online Privacy” It is essential that we teach our students that NOTHING they do online is EVER private. Social media sites such as Facebook have created a false sense of privacy for our students. They are lured into believing that privacy settings allow them to be protected. It is crucial that they understand what “digital” means. This...

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Digital Literacy in the Classroom? There is a TED Talk for that!
May26

Digital Literacy in the Classroom? There is a TED Talk for that!

My Personal Favorite – TED Talk – Eli Pariser: Beware Online “Filter Bubbles”   As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there’s a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a “filter bubble” and don’t get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy. Description from TED Talk site. TED Talk – Adam Ostrow: – After Your Final Status Update  Many of us have a social media presence — a virtual personality made up of status updates, tweets and connections, stored in the cloud. Adam Ostrow asks a big question: What happens to that personality after you’ve died? Could it … live on? Description from TED Talk site. TED Talk – Kevin Allocca – Why Videos Go Viral Kevin Allocca is YouTube’s trends manager, and he has deep thoughts about silly web video. In this talk from TEDYouth, he shares the 4 reasons a video goes viral. Description from TED Talk site. TED Talk – Clay Shirky – How Social Media Can Make History While news from Iran streams to the world, Clay Shirky shows how Facebook, Twitter, and TXTs help citizens in repressive regimes report on real news, bypassing censors (however briefly). The end of top-down control of news is changing the nature of politics. Description from YouTube. TEDxWarwick – Doug Belshaw – The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies Share...

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